Public Discussion

  • Icon for: Colleen Lewis

    Colleen Lewis

    Facilitator
    May 16, 2016 | 02:49 p.m.

    Thanks for sharing the project! Can you share some of the outcomes of the project? Are all of the students served from the Coeur d’Alene Tribe, Spokane Tribe?
    Would one of the publications here be helpful to see some of the outcomes?
    http://www.uibtte.org/publications-and-presenta...

    — It looks like the teacher resources aren’t publicly available here:
    http://www.uibtte.org/teacher-resources I get an error message saying that I have to request access to the google doc.

    Thanks!
    - Colleen

  • Icon for: Anne Kern

    Anne Kern

    Presenter
    May 18, 2016 | 12:42 a.m.

    Yes, all student live on the reservations and are Tribal members.

    We are currently writing up and submitting outcomes from the camps. However, we are working with our Tribal partners to gain approval for dissemination of outcomes and culturally sensitive data.

    In addition, we have not made any of our teacher resources or curriculum publicly available as we are again working with our Tribal partners to honor their review and approval to disseminate.

    I hope that helps explain somethings!
    Best,
    Anne

  • Icon for: Steven Bean

    Steven Bean

    Enterprise Director, Digital NEST, Watsonville CA
    May 16, 2016 | 05:00 p.m.

    I VERY MUCH appreciate that you are teaching the scientific value of ancient empirical methodology in the age of experimental science. I would level a cultural critique at the “western” scientific-industrial complex for “imperializing” methodology and denying the validity of scientific knowledge verified by 10,000 years of observation. We’re addressing a very similar issue at the Digital NEST when we teach our Latino youth Members that they come from an un-recognized culture of entrepreneurship. Their “tios/tias” (“uncles”/“aunts”) are selling tamales, decorating cakes, fixing cars – anything they can do to help the family makes ends meet. But here in Watsonville and Salinas CA, in the shadow of Silicon Valley, the dominant culture doesn’t credit it if it doesn’t involve venture capital, a digital technology product or lead to an initial public offering of stock.
    http://stemforall2016.videohall.com/presentatio...

  • Icon for: Anne Kern

    Anne Kern

    Presenter
    May 18, 2016 | 12:48 a.m.

    Working with marginalized communities and culture is tricky and takes lots relationship building, asking questions about what is important to the community, and listening!

    It maybe hard work and not what we “western Researchers” are use to but it is well worth the effort!

    Good luck with your project!
    Anne

  • Icon for: Susan Kowalski

    Susan Kowalski

    Senior Research Scientist
    May 16, 2016 | 05:08 p.m.

    Hi Anne! It’s interesting to learn about your work. The integration of STEM with cultural contexts is so important.

  • Icon for: Anne Kern

    Anne Kern

    Presenter
    May 18, 2016 | 12:49 a.m.

    Hello back to you Susan!
    Good to hear from you! Sounds like you are doing some fun stuff!
    Cheers,
    Anne

  • Icon for: Sameer Honwad

    Sameer Honwad

    Co-Presenter
    May 16, 2016 | 05:13 p.m.

    Thank you Colleen and Steve for watching our video. We do have teacher materials we can share. We have not yet made the materials public because they are not written in a formal “lesson plan” format. If you want to send Anne or me an email we would be happy to share the materials with you.

    Steve you raise a very important point. Our team has been discussing this issue of using culturally relevant methodology to understand how Native American students learn science phenomena. We are trying to organize groups of scholars and practitioners to dicuss this very important issue. We would love it if you have any resources to share in that regard.

  • Icon for: Steven Bean

    Steven Bean

    Enterprise Director, Digital NEST, Watsonville CA
    May 16, 2016 | 05:50 p.m.

    Sameer, we published a bunch of stuff about culturally sensitive approaches with Latinas/os under our ITEST grants – my colleague and co-presenter Jill Denner is the best person to refer you to specific resources. IMHO,the first thing required are truly culturally competent educators. Taking a page from Hack the Hood we teach our youth Members the concept of code-switching and present it as a form of multi-culturalism and a competitive advantage in the tech workforce.

  • Icon for: Barry Fishman

    Barry Fishman

    Facilitator
    May 17, 2016 | 03:57 p.m.

    So many great images in this video! The mix of science and culture is powerful. Do you primarily use your curriculum as an “add on” to the standard school-based curricula, or can it replace school-based materials (i.e., meet all of the grade-level standards for a particular group of students).

  • Icon for: Anne Kern

    Anne Kern

    Presenter
    May 18, 2016 | 12:59 a.m.

    Currently, the BTTE curriculum is not available for public dissemination. We are working with our Tribal partners for approval to disseminate the curriculum, however we need to honor any sensitive information that was used by either redacting it or keep private.

  • Icon for: Sameer Honwad

    Sameer Honwad

    Co-Presenter
    May 17, 2016 | 07:13 p.m.

    The curriculum is currently in “summer camp” format, which offers us a little flexibility with the content. However we are in the process of thinking about; what would a formal school based curriculum look like when aligned with cultural epistemology? We have been developing a strong partnership with the Couer d Alene tribe and the parternship has been involved in discussions realted to cultrually relevant school based curriculum.

  • Icon for: Catherine Matthews

    Catherine Matthews

    May 17, 2016 | 11:56 p.m.

    We (The HERP Project members) conduct a summer science herpetological research experience for rising 9th through 12th graders. One of our sites is near the traditional home of the Lumbee Indians. We have had a significant number of Lumbees participate in our program and the richness of their cultural histories and cultural experiences has greatly enhanced our program. How specifically do you link cultural issues with STEM learning?

  • Icon for: Anne Kern

    Anne Kern

    Presenter
    May 18, 2016 | 12:52 a.m.

    Each year we are getting better! One key is to work and honor your communities. Ask and talk to community elders and experts to help, even teach you along with the students about their ways of knowing and living. It’s important to honors different knowledge systems.

    Good luck!

  • Icon for: Cullen White

    Cullen White

    Facilitator
    May 19, 2016 | 02:54 a.m.

    Anne, I sincerely appreciate the culturally responsive approach that you and your team appear to have taken. This is an exceptionally fascinating project and I would love to understand how you have approached the work from a process standpoint (avoiding the need to share any potentially sensitive information).

  • Icon for: Anne Kern

    Anne Kern

    Presenter
    May 20, 2016 | 11:09 a.m.

    I think the most important thing to keep in mind when working with communities is to be sure that there is transparency with the goals, purposes, and development of the project is developed from the very beginning . Many times research initiatives are brought to communities AFTER a project has been funded-looking for partners and participation-when perhaps the project should have been developed with the community before it was proposed. Unfortunately it was after we received funding that I found journal articles about development of partnerships with communities, and most of these journals were in areas outside the STEM education scholarship-i.e. social sciences, health care…

  • Further posting is closed as the showcase has ended.

  1. Anne Kern
  2. https://www.uidaho.edu/ed/ci/curriculum-and-instruction-faculty/anne-liu-kern
  3. Associate Professor
  4. Back to the Earth, Year 3
  5. http://www.uibtte.org
  6. University of Idaho
  1. Fritz Fiedler
  2. Associate Professor
  3. Back to the Earth, Year 3
  4. http://www.uibtte.org
  5. University of Idaho
  1. Sameer Honwad
  2. Assistant Professor
  3. Back to the Earth, Year 3
  4. http://www.uibtte.org
  5. University of New Hampshire
  1. Mindy Howard
  2. http://www.uibtte.org/
  3. Doctoral Students
  4. Back to the Earth, Year 3
  5. http://www.uibtte.org
  6. University of Idaho
  1. Laura Laumatia
  2. Environmental Specialist
  3. Back to the Earth, Year 3
  4. http://www.uibtte.org
  5. Coeur d'Alene Tribe, University of Idaho

Back to the Earth-Y3
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Back to the Earth (BTTE) is a community-based youth education partnership between the Coeur d’Alene Tribe, Spokane Tribe, and the University of Idaho. The BTTE project aims to develop and deliver culturally-rich science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learning opportunities to students in grades 4-7 on the Coeur d’Alene and Spokane Indian Reservations. All lessons and activities will engage youth in the place and the local community through the context of local values and culture as they relate to STEM.
The following objectives will be studied through research:
● Increase student knowledge in (1) science and technology content, and (2) use of inquiry skills;
● Enhance student attitude toward (1) science, technology, and engineering content, and (2) science, technology, and engineering careers;
● Enhance community partnerships for developing an Indigenous STEM workforce.