Public Discussion

  • Icon for: Helen Teague

    Helen Teague

    Co-Presenter
    May 16, 2016 | 02:47 p.m.

    Thank you for joining us for “A cyber-ensemble of learning tools and strategies.” We are interested in your comments, ideas, and questions. Please feel free to join our discussion!
    You can also see additional information at this link: http://teacherscreate.org

  • Icon for: Brian Drayton

    Brian Drayton

    Co-Principal Investigator
    May 17, 2016 | 09:21 a.m.

    Hi, I really enjoyed this — the interview segments are quite compelling, and of course it would have been great to follow a particular science or math project to see it unfold. How central is some kind of teacher “console” — are students’ devices echoed on the teacher’s, for example? Is there a shared work space where students can “drop in” on others’ work, or is the sharing at the discretion of the student or team?
    Did one young woman talk about how this would help her with a class of 48? Or did I mis hear? Hope so!

  • Icon for: Helen Teague

    Helen Teague

    Co-Presenter
    May 17, 2016 | 09:26 a.m.

    Brian: you heard correctly: the teachers all have massive student loads (48+)! They are dedicated and innovative and as I’ve transcribed video footage, I am so respectful of their kindness to all students in such large classes!

  • Icon for: Sarah Gerard

    Sarah Gerard

    Facilitator
    May 17, 2016 | 05:43 p.m.

    Loved hearing from the student now inspired to become a teacher herself, as well as the teacher discussing how it positively impacted her relationship with her students. Your description says that there are also participant schools in Africa – in which countries? How has implementation differed in that context?

  • Icon for: Hiroo Kato

    Hiroo Kato

    Presenter
    May 18, 2016 | 12:59 p.m.

    The work in Africa has primarily been about media making, where we have local teachers (and sometimes students) create instructional videos in their local context. We have conducted workshops in Kenya, Uganda, Ethiopia, Ghana, and Namibia. Some of the considerations have been in delivering instructional video data in the absence of an internet connection, but also in thinking about how to self-sustain these activities on a larger timescale. A separate video is posted on #821 http://stemforall2016.videohall.com/presentatio...

  • Icon for: Kelly Pudelek

    Kelly Pudelek

    Facilitator
    May 18, 2016 | 12:28 a.m.

    I really loved the screen-sharing software since it really shows the thought process of the students. Do you think there are specific age groups that would benefit the most from these learning techniques? What is the process of implementing these tools in a classroom?

  • Icon for: Hiroo Kato

    Hiroo Kato

    Presenter
    May 18, 2016 | 12:39 p.m.

    Hi Kelly. The screen-sharing also allows students that are not as outgoing to grab a teacher’s attention. A teacher can also control a student’s screen, and conduct instant polls, as well as do on-screen instructions, where the teacher writes on her/his screen, and it would show on the students’ screen.

    So far, this has been implemented in high schools only. It has been very useful to have the help of students in setting this up and getting their specific feedback. There have been some challenges with stable connectivity between the computers, which the students have been able to adapt to.

    The screen-sharing software used is LanSchool. In order to implement, we have used funding to purchase pen input computer devices, licenses for LanSchool, and the teachers would need training to use this. Some of the logistical considerations have been: making sure the tablet devices are charged and ready; secure storing of the devices; and moving the devices from one classroom to another in an efficient way.

  • Icon for: Kelly Pudelek

    Kelly Pudelek

    Facilitator
    May 21, 2016 | 06:42 p.m.

    Thanks for the info! About how does it take for teachers and students to learn and get used to the devices?

  • Icon for: Debra Sterling Chittur

    Debra Sterling Chittur

    Co-Presenter
    May 18, 2016 | 01:18 a.m.

    Kelly, if you are going to use video editing software, it is probably best if the students are middle school or higher, but elementary school students could make videos that are not edited using simply pen and paper. We have used some low tech versions of the CyberEnsemble in Africa, for example.

    The processes vary according to location and the needs of the teacher and students. At the schools shown in the video, students work, usually together in pairs, with pen and tablet, making and editing their own math videos. The learning environment and format varies—sometimes the CyberEnsemble is used in a summer workshop or an after-school club. Other times it is used in the classroom. The possibilities are endless, really. The math teachers work closely with researchers to come up with interesting and novel ways to implement the tools.

  • Icon for: Kelly Pudelek

    Kelly Pudelek

    Facilitator
    May 21, 2016 | 06:40 p.m.

    I love how these tools are flexible enough that they can be used in a variety of contexts.

  • Icon for: Betsy Stefany

    Betsy Stefany

    Coordinator STEM Literacy Community of Practice
    May 18, 2016 | 11:39 a.m.

    Thank you for sharing the overview of a class engaged and focused on their digital tools. We often hear of 1-to-1 and visualize it as mass of internally focused, individuals that we see waiting for a train. They are obviously absorbed but conscious that they are “in class” and responding to their assignment, each other and the expectations of the class. Also wonderful to have a teacher agree that learning with the students can bond and share the mentoring expected of a teacher. Finding “common ground” is a fine event in learning. I agree to with Sarah..that hearing the student on video discussing her goals and expectations for a teaching career builds a bond with us out here watching!

  • Icon for: Helen Teague

    Helen Teague

    Co-Presenter
    May 18, 2016 | 11:05 p.m.

    Betsy: I’ve been part of the transcription team for almost three years, and it is just always is so rewarding to see the interplay of teacher as student and student as teacher. Students are gaining respect for the difficult work of their teachers and their teachers are seeing how seriously their students work to gain concept mastery. Thank you for your comment!

  • Icon for: Marian Pasquale

    Marian Pasquale

    Facilitator
    May 19, 2016 | 08:40 a.m.

    This project has done something that is hard to do, improve teacher-student communication and “connect” them, as one teacher said. What did you provide for professional development and how long did it take for teachers and students to get to common ground?

  • Icon for: Debra Sterling Chittur

    Debra Sterling Chittur

    Co-Presenter
    May 21, 2016 | 07:01 p.m.

    At many of our sites, we use a workshop format to train teachers—they work with students during the workshops to learn how to use the tools, and leave the workshops with lesson plans they can implement in an upcoming class. They continue to learn through the implementation phase. At the two locations featured in the videos, we have weekly Skype meetings with the teachers and researchers visit the sites several times a year to support the teachers and collect data.

  • Further posting is closed as the showcase has ended.

  1. Hiroo Kato
  2. A cyber-ensemble of inversion, immersion, collaborative workspaces, query and media-making in learning
  3. Pepperdine University
  1. Traci Garff
  2. Research Assistant
  3. A cyber-ensemble of inversion, immersion, collaborative workspaces, query and media-making in learning
  4. Pepperdine University
  1. Debra Sterling Chittur
  2. A cyber-ensemble of inversion, immersion, collaborative workspaces, query and media-making in learning
  3. Pepperdine University
  1. Helen Teague
  2. https://www.linkedin.com/in/teague4oops
  3. A cyber-ensemble of inversion, immersion, collaborative workspaces, query and media-making in learning
  4. A cyber-ensemble of inversion, immersion, collaborative workspaces, query and media-making in learning
  5. Pepperdine University

A cyber-ensemble of inversion, immersion, collaborative workspaces, query and media-making in learning
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This video explores changes in learning and identity when students and teachers collaborate in an ensemble approach to cyberlearning tools and strategies. This particular ensemble includes collaborative & screen sharing software systems, pen and touch computing, media-making, classroom flipping, mobile devices, and natural language software agents. The project explores learner immersion and the coordination of multiple tools to create a synergistic cyber-enabled learning ecosystem with potential to contribute to future learning environments. It includes participant schools in the US and in Sub-Saharan Africa.